Meet Fanny Burney, the Author Every Austenite Has Been Looking For

SIENNA VITTORIA LEE-COUGHLIN

It is a truth universally acknowledged that Jane Austen left us far too little to read.

If you’ve re-read her novels so many times that your copies have split spines and pages so dog-eared that they’re falling apart, you’re in good company. Austen is still one of the most beloved writers of all time, even two centuries after her death. Her books are continually sought-after, and the movie and television adaptations just keep coming—PBS Masterpiece just aired a Sanditon miniseries, and a new Emma film is set to premiere tonight.

There’s something irresistible about her works—perhaps because they’re equal parts witty and whimsical, they’re somehow satirical and romantic at the same time, and they manage to be deeply insightful and effortlessly enjoyable.

But, before there was Jane Austen, there was Frances (Fanny) Burney, an eighteenth-century author who inspired the next generation of women writers. In fact, when Burney released her novel Camilla in subscription format in 1796, among the list of subscribers was one Miss J. Austen.

When I stumbled upon Burney for the first time, I was instantly smitten. Reading her novels made me feel like I was in a familiar place—they are witty, intelligent, and lovely, just like Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, and Mansfield Park.

So, who was Fanny Burney?

Burney was born in 1752 in the English county of Norfolk, the daughter of musician Charles Burney. She was supposedly a slow learner, only beginning to read at 10 years old, but from that point on she devoured everything she could get her hands on.

As a young girl, words poured out of her, and she produced piles of juvenilia, including plays, songs, and poems. At 15 years old, she tossed it all into a bonfire—perhaps due to her stepmother’s disapproval, who did not consider writing a ladylike pursuit.

But she couldn’t keep her pen down, and soon she was back at it. She began writing a journal, which she would keep for more than 70 years, commenting on the everyday happenings of London society from the Georgian era into the early years of Victoria’s reign.

A lady of letters

Her social observations inspired her professional work, and in her mid-twenties, she released her first novel: Evelina, or, The History of a Young Lady’s Entrance into the World(1778). Told in epistolary fashion, this satirical book follows the foibles of a young inexperienced girl when she enters fashionable society.

She published it anonymously, but it was so well-received that everyone wanted to know the identity of its mysterious author. Once her identity was announced, her success persuaded her father to reconsider his disapproval of her profession.

Her next novel was Cecilia, or, Memoirs of an Heiress(1782), which tells the story of a spirited young heiress who can only keep her fortune if her husband agrees to take her name in marriage. It was likewise successful, and Burney’s name became even more recognized.

In contrast to Austen’s charming country life, Burney lived right in the center of things—frequenting the theatres and operas of London and even serving Queen Charlotte (wife of George III) for a time. She regularly encountered important men of the time like Edmund Burke and Samuel Johnson.

Later life and legacy

After her stint at court, Burney visited family friends and her sister Susan at Norbury Park, where she met a group of French émigrés settled nearby. A man named Alexandre-Jean-Baptiste Piochard d’Arblay began to court her, and the two married in 1793.

She resumed her writing and published Camilla, or, A Picture of Youthin 1796. Her husband was supportive of her work and acted as her copyist. Camilla was another widely successful book, beloved for its romance, sharp insight into human nature, and endearing characters.

In 1802, they moved to France in hopes of recovering property that d’Arblay lost in the French Revolution. There, Burney continued to write and publish, and her husband took a job in the Napoleonic government. After her husband died, she returned to London and edited her father’s memoirs for publication. She died in 1840 at 87 years old.

Though much-neglected by readers today, her legacy is lasting and important. Virginia Woolf dubbed her the “mother of English fiction.” Her influence can be traced through the next century, carrying us right through Jane Austen’s comedies of manners, Charles Dickens’ insightful realism, and the social satires of William Makepeace Thackeray—not to mention that her reputation as a respected lady of letters also paved the way for female writers like the Brontës and Elizabeth Gaskell.

So, before you pick up that battered copy of Pride and Prejudice for the hundred-seventy-third time, give one of Burney’s novels a try instead. Don’t worry, Austen’s novels will still be there when you’re done. 

https://verilymag.com/2020/02/fanny-burney-jane-austen-reading-recommendation-emma-2020

The Thoughtful Girl’s Guide to Fashion, Communication, and Friendship

By Mary Sheehan Warren

Finally!!! A practical guide for girls on the art of communicating to be understood as a person with value and dignity. Beginning with a thorough exploration and explanation of that dignity and value by asking questions for self-reflection and by telling the stories of famous (and not so famous) people. In our world which is so confused about the very basics—the value of human life, the meaning and purpose of sexuality, why beauty matters, and what exactly constitutes true freedom—this book is much needed as it shows THAT communication is ultimately about mutual respect, virtue, and friendship, and then, shows YOU how to pull it off!

So, girls: What do you need to know about listening, speaking, writing, dressing, and etiquette?

You need to know how to:

· Get closer to discovering your mission and purpose in life.
· Improve your listening and refine your speaking.
· Be a better friend.
· Understand your own “style” for connecting with others.
· Date without losing your mind.
· Avoid making snap judgments and stereotyping.
· Handle what looks like an insult (but might not be).
· Know more about the world of fashion.
· Dress in a way that says the best about you
· Choose an outfit for any occasion.
· Have fun at a party.
· Conduct yourself during a job interview.
· Discern valid sources of news and information.
· Take the stress out of writing for everyday purposes.
· Get a grip on digital communications such as texting, email, and social media.
· Understand and employ the rules of etiquette which foster respect for the value and dignity of others.

Winter’s Sound of Silence

By Alicia Woodward

Our end of the lake is frozen in suspended stillness. Birds and snowflakes flutter to the ground without a sound. A deer and her fawn pause motionless by the edge of the woods. Fir trees sway to the silent tune of a gentle wind. A red fox tip-toes down a frosty hill.

I wish I could encase the hushed winter scene in the round glass of a snow globe to gaze upon when the lake transforms into a carnival of summer activity.

American author Florence Page Jaques must have understood when she wrote, “I love the deep silence of the midwinter woods. It is a stillness you can rest your whole weight against. This stillness is so profound you are sure it will hold and last.”

I’ve always craved the sound of silence. Growing up, I was blessed with two spirited younger sisters. On inescapable car rides, I longed to stare out the window and daydream while they laughed uproariously, sang off-key and told grueling jokes. I’d wail, “Mom, make them stop!” Happily, the situation is no different now, though my tolerance has improved.
In exchange for getting to read stories and poetry all day, I spent most of my adult life in a small square room with a daily charge of more than 100 boisterous adolescents. Months after I retired from teaching, I still caught myself habitually “shushing” absolutely no one.

My own children were not particularly loud or rambunctious, but my daughter was born belting show tunes. Our home sounded like a never-ending rehearsal for the Tony Awards. Her more reserved younger brother often echoed a familiar refrain, “Mom, make her stop!”

Though I cherish seasons past, they help me appreciate and enjoy the deep silence of the midwinter woods. Each season has something to teach us; winter’s lesson lies in the beauty of her silence. Here are ten ways we can follow winter’s lead to bring a little more peace and quiet to our days.

  1. Speak with a softer volume and tone of voice.
  2. Avoid complaining, gossiping, criticizing, babbling, arguing, and opining.
  3. Turn off the television and other noise in your home.
  4. Ride in the car without music or news.
  5. Take a break from social media.
  6. Pray or meditate in silence.
  7. Engage in a quiet activity like a puzzle or game.
  8. Stop being so busy.
  9. Encourage children to enjoy quiet time.
  10. Observe and learn from winter’s sound of silence.

https://minimalism.life/journal/winters-sound-of-silence